Three Things Thursday

What I’m Reading:  “Into the Magic Shop” by James R. Doty. Doty a neurosurgeon and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford University, writes about his rough childhood and his research into the connection between our brain, and our hearts. It gives practical instructions for meditation and empowers readers to take control of their emotional and physical lives. A great read!

Into the Magic Shop

Building Confident Learners: Take breaks when necessary. Sometimes it’s helpful to set a timer for work periods and another for break periods when working or studying for a period that is over an hour. This helps build in necessary brain brains without having to overthink it.

What Gives Me Joy: Family and local restaurants. My uncle and aunt stopped in town on their way to Charleston and we had lunch at The Farmer’s Table. It was great to spend a few hours with my Wisconsin family (who I miss) while enjoying a delicious meal!

Farmers table

The joy of learning. Together.

Nora

Anxiety in Children: Calming Down

Another Tuesday, another Passionate Parent Advocate post about anxiety! Below are three more ideas to alleviate anxiety in children. You can use any of these during a bout of anxiety, but I think they’re great to build in as a preventative daily routine as well.

calm rocks

  1. If your child needs space to relax you can make calm jars easily at home. Just google “calm jars” and you’ll find a plethora of options and DIY instructions. Once you have a calm jar made you can use it in many ways! If a child is experiencing acute anxiety or frustration it can be used as a timer. For example, you can shake up the jar and give it to the child. Ask them to find a place they enjoy sitting or that they feel comfortable in. Then, ask them to watch the jar (holding it still and upright) and concentrate on the sparkles. When the sparkles have all settled at the bottom they can come back and try again!
  2. Meditation for kids and basic stretching routines. You can find a lot of information on meditation for kids and work in any stretching you like! Remember meditation does NOT have to be sitting totally still without thinking. That’s really hard for kids and adults alike so start by just sitting still for a few minutes at a time. Concentrate on the sounds around you, how your body feels in the moment, and your breathing.  Even two minutes is better then nothing! It may help to find a guided mediation that suits you.
  3. If you like essential oils diffusing them, and using something like lavender can be soothing when studying, reading, doing homework, or at bedtime. Essential oils can be very strong so talk to someone who knows a lot about them before using them for anything other than diffusing.

The joy of learning. Together. 

Nora